May 21, 2018 Articles, Press More: ,

Cobb talks health care, campaign finance reform and more at informal ‘community conversation’

“Currently, Cobb leads the Democratic race in terms of petition signatures gathered (nearly 5,400) and her volunteer force, which boasts roughly 750 members, some of whom now operate out of the recently-opened Cobb campaign headquarters in Canton. She also leads the remaining candidates in terms of money raised, now that Don Boyajian has withdrawn from the congressional contest to instead run for a state Assembly seat.”


By JOSH DAVIS
FRIDAY, MAY 18, 2018

DICKINSON –– Congressional hopeful Tedra Cobb visited Dickinson’s Township Brewing Company to engage with voters on topics ranging from health care and campaign finance reform to government transparency and her own credentials as a potential member of Congress.

Roughly two dozen residents listened and engaged with Cobb’s informal community conversation Thursday evening, a format she described as the ideal model for gathering public opinion and concern.

When asked what sets Cobb’s candidacy apart from the thinning herd of other Democratic hopefuls, Cobb cited her “experience solving problems here in the community” as a two-term member of the St. Lawrence County Legislature and a career working with health care nonprofits. Cobb noted that she is the only Democratic candidate who has been elected to and held a political position.

Health care served as one of Cobb’s primary talking points, with the candidate calling for improved access to primary and mental health care as well as improving the handling of prescription medications in a step to address the social ills brought by the opioid epidemic.

While she stopped short of endorsing a single-payer health care system exclusively, Cobb described a “Medicare-for-all” system as “one of the options” she would consider as a representative.

Cobb also touched on topics including the war on drugs, the corrupting influence of lobbyists in Washington, and the importance of supporting public schools.

The Democrat also took aim at incumbent Republican Elise Stefanik’s communications with the public and residency, describing a “fake town hall” held in South Glens Falls led by a moderator where “(Stefanik) was the only one with a microphone.”

She also obliquely questioned Stefanik’s legitimacy as a resident of the 21st Congressional District, an issue first raised during Stefanik’s 2014 GOP primary contest against Matthew Doheny..

“We deserve a representative who lives here … I don’t just mean someone who visits,” Cobb said.

Stefanik lists the Essex County community of Willsboro as her residence and splits her time between New York and Washington, D.C., where she worked for a number of years before making her initial congressional bid.

Currently, Cobb leads the Democratic race in terms of petition signatures gathered (nearly 5,400) and her volunteer force, which boasts roughly 750 members, some of whom now operate out of the recently-opened Cobb campaign headquarters in Canton. She also leads the remaining candidates in terms of money raised, now that Don Boyajian has withdrawn from the congressional contest to instead run for a state Assembly seat.

The other Democrats still in the race to challenge Stefanik are Emily Martz of Saranac Lake, Katie Wilson of Keene, Dylan Ratigan of Lake Placid and Patrick Nelson of Stillwater.

Read the article here: http://www.mymalonetelegram.com/mtg01/cobb-talks-health-care-campaign-finance-reform-and-more-at-informal-community-conversation-20180518

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